Academic Center Courses

English

English Language Arts II

ELA II is a course in literacy in which students master the Pennsylvania Core Standards and prepare for the Keystone Literature exam. Throughout the school year, students continue their in-depth study of a variety of literature. Students also continue to develop their vocabulary and writing skills. Literature study covers a wide variety of genres to improve comprehension and appreciation through a range of reading assignments. Students further develop composition skills through the writing process. Career and Technical Lab textbooks are used for supplemental readings as are various works of classic and contemporary non-fiction. Instruction is delivered in the domains of focus, content, organization, and style.

English Language Arts III

This course focuses on classical and contemporary American literature. There is an emphasis on students’ communication skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening; increase comprehension strategies; evaluate historical and social influences which impact American literature; develop test-taking strategies; and prepare various types of writing according to MLA guidelines. Non-fiction works from scholarly and popular periodicals are used in every unit to aid in connecting the literary canon to real-world concerns. Students use Career and Technical Lab-based texts and trade publications to complete research and reinforce career information comprehension. This course is aligned to the Pennsylvania Core Standards.

Accelerated English Language Arts III

This course focuses on classical and contemporary American literature as well as non-fiction works from scholarly and popular periodicals. The student will improve communication skills in reading, writing, speaking, and listening; increase comprehension strategies; evaluate historical, cultural and social influences which impact American literature; develop test-taking strategies; and prepare various types of writing according to MLA guidelines. Students will use Career and Technical Lab-based texts and trade publications to complete research and reinforce career information comprehension. This course is aligned to the Pennsylvania Core Standards and will assist students in preparing for the SAT/ACT exams.

While the accelerated class is not an honors or AP course, it does provide a more rigorous workload than the traditional senior class offering. A primary difference between the classes is in the instructional approach. Accelerated ELA III (ELA III) provides more of a college experience with less of an emphasis on daily assignments and more of an emphasis on authentic learning, inquiry-based and project-based learning. Students in the accelerated course engage in more independent reading and write more essays. There is also a greater emphasis on class discussions, debates, higher-level critical thinking skills, and 21st century skills. Students will be able to use these skills in many post-high school options in college and the work force.

Prerequisite: Grade of B or higher in 10th-grade ELA

English Language Arts IV

This course focuses on the study and interpretation of British, American, and World Literature, research-based oral and written presentations, communications skill refinement, expository and creative writing, and vocabulary study. Literature choices, both fiction and non-fiction, focus on the year-long theme Become the Hero of Your Own Life Journey. Students will examine the concept of the hero/heroine by exploring the choices, conflicts, relationships, and consequences of characters in the literature under study and relating this to their own lives through authentic learning and inquiry-based and project-based learning. Additionally, they will complete oral and written presentations related to practical communication skills required for post-secondary education and careers. Students continue to use Career and Technical Lab-based texts, technology, and print media to complete research and reinforce career information comprehension. Students use online data bases and periodicals to read and write critically about literature read, student career readiness, modern social problems, and technical skills, as well as their lifelong philosophies and goals in preparation for college and their careers.

Accelerated English Language Arts IV

Accelerated ELA IV is an alternative to the regular ELA IV course offering. While the accelerated class is not an honors or AP course, it does provide a rigorous workload for students whom enroll in this course. A primary difference between the classes is in the instructional approach. Accelerated ELA IV provides more of a college experience with less of an emphasis on daily assignments and more of an emphasis on authentic learning, inquiry-based and project-based learning.

Like ELA IV, the class focuses on the Pennsylvania Core Standards of reading, writing, listening, and speaking. The class content centers on the study and interpretation of British and World Literature and makes use of oral and written presentations, communication skills, expository and creative writing, and college-level vocabulary enrichment to enhance student learning. Oral and written presentations are related to practical communication skills needed for post-secondary education. Students will continue to use Career and Technical Lab-based texts and trade publications to complete research and reinforce career information comprehension.

Prerequisite: Grade of B or higher in 11th-grade ELA

Math

Algebra II

Algebra II is the study of the complex number systems, symbolic manipulation, and functions. Students discuss, represent, and solve increasingly sophisticated real-world problems using advanced algebraic and data analysis techniques incorporating technology. They also study the properties of functions and the algebra of functions. Linear, quadratic, exponential, logarithmic, polynomial, and rational functions are studied with an emphasis on making connections to other content areas and real life applications. The applications are related to the students’ career and technical programs. Mathematical communication and problem-solving skills play an important role in this course to prepare students for life-long learning. This course is designed for students who have completed Algebra I and Geometry and is aligned to the Pennsylvania Core Mathematics Standards and the Pennsylvania Core Standards in reading and writing for Science and Technical Subjects.

Geometry

Geometry is the study of the mathematics of the physical world. This course emphasizes the connection between theory and the practical/technical application with the inclusion of formal proofs and the use of algebra in problem-solving. Creating graphic organizers, word sorts, and measuring stations are included to discover and apply the concepts that are taught during the course. This course is aligned to the Pennsylvania Core Mathematics Standards and the Pennsylvania Core Standards in reading and writing for Science and Technical Subjects. Relationships are made between geometric concepts and various career and technical programs.

Pre-Calculus

Pre-Calculus is designed for Academic Center students who have successfully completed Algebra I, Algebra II and Geometry. This course focuses on real-life applications of Linear Relations and Functions, Systems of Equations and Inequalities, Nature of Graphs, Polynomial and Rational Functions, Trigonometric Functions, Graphs of Trigonometric Functions, and Trigonometric Identities and Equations. Incorporated within the course is the use of technology, authentic learning, and problem solving strategies. This course is aligned to the Pennsylvania Core Mathematics Standards and the Pennsylvania Core Standards in reading and writing for Science and Technical Subjects. Relationships are made between course content and various career and technical programs.

Calculus

Calculus is the study of change. Unlike previous math courses Calculus is concerned with what is happening at this instant in time rather than change over a period of time. During this course students study a variety of functions and their applications which lead into the study of a function’s limit and derivative. The limit and derivative allows students to study instantaneous change of function in order to make accurate real-life interpretations. After the study of derivatives and their applications students study anti-derivatives and integrals which have their own unique real-life applications. This course is aligned to the Pennsylvania Core Mathematics Standards and the Pennsylvania Core Standards in reading and writing for Science and Technical Subjects. Relationships are made between course content and various career and technical programs.

Science

acphysics9x8Biology

The Biology course meets the requirements for Keystone Standards and eligible content. Students engage, learn, and master core concepts of biological principles throughout nine major units from the first organisms and their classifications to their complexities at the cellular level. Organisms are explored and investigated at the anatomical and physiological level. There is also an emphasis on interactions with the environment and ecology. Students experience hands-on learning with various laboratory activities, group work, projects, and technological assignments. This biology course functions at the college preparatory level, enabling students to gain the skills and knowledge for future biological sciences at a post-secondary institution. The Pennsylvania Core Standards in reading and writing for Science and Technical subjects are emphasized to gain important skills necessary for a post secondary education. This course is aligned to the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Science and Technology and Engineering Education. The activities within the course are related to the students’ career and technical programs.

Chemistry

The Chemistry course has been developed to meet the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Science and Technology and Engineering Education. The Pennsylvania Core Standards in reading and writing for Science and Technical subjects are emphasized. Chemistry is a lab-based course designed to incorporate the discussion of measurements, the periodic table, equations, reactions, phases of matter, and other essential Chemistry concepts. Students perform several hands-on applications of course concepts and experiments. Students are required to display mastery of these concepts in informal and formal assessments; i.e. lab reports, group activities, classroom assignments, a midterm, and a comprehensive final exam.  Students also use various math and literacy strategies to aid in their success in Chemistry. The Chemistry assignments also include the integrated concepts between this science lab and various career and technical programs.

Environmental Science

Environmental Science provides an opportunity for students to study man’s interaction with the environment. Topics include pollution, conservation of natural resources, environmental management and planning, and society’s impact on the environment. The students are also provided with an opportunity to study the mutual relationships between living organisms and physical factors in their environments. Topics include but are not limited to: biotic and abiotic factors, energy relationships, bio-geologic cycles, population dynamics, ecosystems, and biogeography. Laboratory activities are an integral part of this course.  This course is aligned with the Pennsylvania Core Standards for listening, reading, writing, and speaking including the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Environment and Ecology to enhance student learning and achievement. Relationships are made between the concepts covered in this course and various career and technical programs.

Physics I

This course is aligned to meet the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Science and Technology and Engineering Education. The Pennsylvania Core Standards in reading and writing for Science and Technical subjects are emphasized to enhance student learning and achievement. Physics I is a lab-based course designed to incorporate the discussion of motion, vectors, forces, momentum, energy, circular motion, gravitation, heat, simple harmonic motion, sound, reflection, circuits, magnetism, and other essential Physics concepts. Students perform several hands-on applications of course concepts and experiments. Students are required to display mastery of these concepts in formal assessments, lab reports, group activities and classroom assignments. Students also use various math and literacy strategies to aid in their success in Physics I. The Physics I assignments also include the integrated concepts between this science lab and various career and technical programs.

Prerequisite: Recommended grade of C or higher in Algebra I with concurrent enrollment in Algebra II

Physics II

This course is aligned to meet the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Science and Technology and Engineering Education. The Pennsylvania Core Standards in reading and writing for Science and Technical subjects are emphasized to enhance student learning and achievement. Physics II is a lab-based course designed to incorporate the discussion of force, work, rate, resistance, energy, power, force transformers, momentum, waves and vibrations, energy converters, transducers, radiation, light and optical systems, time constants, and other essential Physics concepts. Students build upon their previous knowledge from Physics I to make authentic connections to their own Career & Technical Lab. Students perform several hands-on applications of course concepts and experiments. Students are required to display mastery of these concepts in formal assessments, lab reports, group activities and classroom assignments. Students also use various math and literacy strategies to aid in their success in Physics II. The Physics II assignments also include the integrated concepts between this science lab and various career and technical programs.

Prerequisite: Grade of C or higher in Physics I

Social Studies

American Studies II

The American Studies II course is designed for tenth grade Academic Center students. The American Studies II course addresses the development of the United States throughout the twentieth century. This course is aligned to the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for History and the Pennsylvania Core Standards in reading and writing for History and Social Studies. Through various activities and lessons, these standards guide understanding of the development of the United States as a world power; focusing on economic and industrial development, political trends, and society and cultural problems and achievements. The students develop an understanding of the progress of technology and social groups. They are expected to evaluate the changes of culture in society and analyze the political contributions of individuals and events of the periods studied. Students also use various math and literacy strategies to aid in their success in the course. American Studies assignments also include the integrated concepts between this history course and various career and technical programs. Students are assessed formally and informally to determine mastery of the content for the duration of the academic year.

World Cultures

World Cultures is a required one semester long course that can be taken during a student’s junior year. This class is a people-centered study involving an in-depth look at the world’s major cultures. The study of each of these cultures focuses upon historical and present-day culture and geography. There is a focus on family life and structure, social organizations, attitude on education, religious beliefs and institutions, economic life and political trends. Students investigate the intellectual and artistic accomplishments of men and women within a given culture. The study of each culture is supplemented by the development of reading, writing, research, geography, critical thinking, study skills/note-taking, technology use and presentation skills. Additionally, the World Culture Course is aligned to the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Geography and the Pennsylvania Core Standards in reading and writing for History and Social Studies. Assignments also include the integrated concepts between this course and various career and technical programs.

American Government/Civics/Economics

The American Government/Civics segment of this course has been developed to meet the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Civics and Government and the Pennsylvania Core Standards in reading and writing for History and Social Studies. This course gives the student a basic understanding of the functions and services of our democratic system. To facilitate such understanding, the students engage in a topical study of our government. First, the students examine how our democratic system developed. Second, the students explain the election process and the party system. Third, the students investigate the specific rights guaranteed to each citizen by our Constitution. Finally, the fourth area involves the three branches of the Federal Government, their functions in the democratic system, and their responsibilities in the country. Students also achieve success in this course by utilizing research based best practices and a variety of math and literacy strategies. Many of the government projects and assignments in this course integrate concepts that are related to various career and technical programs.

The Economic segment of this course has been developed to meet the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Economics and the Pennsylvania Core Standards in reading and writing for History and Social Studies.  The allocation of scarce resources and the implication of choices that people make are studied.  The capacity of society to produce goods and markets used for distribution of goods are examined. National issues such as GNP, unemployment, and inflation are studied.  The appropriate levels of government involvement in the economy as well as taxes and spending are analyzed. Financial markets, capital formation, and international trade are discussed in this course. Relationships are made between economic concepts and various career and technical programs.

Accelerated American Government/Civics/Economics

The Accelerated American Government/Civics/Economics course has been developed to meet the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Civics and Government, the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Economics and the Pennsylvania Core Standards in reading and writing for History and Social Studies. Current events readings from leading periodicals from across the political spectrum occur throughout the course and there is an emphasis on independent and critical reading. Students are required to engage in regular and thoughtful, in-depth classroom discussions and debates on pertinent government and economic topics. Writing is emphasized as students complete journal entries, blogs, and a research paper. The course is designed to prepare students for careers and post secondary education. Course assignments integrate concepts from the students’ career and technical programs.

The Accelerated American Government/Civics segment of this course is a course that provides seniors an understanding of the functions and the services of our democratic system. Areas of study include the development of our democratic system, the election process and the three branches of the Federal Government, their functions in the democratic system, and their responsibilities in the country.

The Economic segment of this course presents introductory concepts of economics such as supply and demand, measuring of economic performance, monetary policy, tax and fiscal policy, all within the framework of the US democracy.

Prerequisite: Grade of B or higher in 11th-grade Social Studies.

Wellness & Fitness

Wellness/Fitness 11

The 11th-grade Wellness/Fitness course is designed for students to acquire and apply the knowledge and skills necessary to promote wellness in their lives. Students rotate in and out of the fitness center and the classroom exploring fitness components, such as cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, body composition, and nutrition. Knowledge learned in the classroom is applied in the fitness center to increase their personal fitness levels. The Pennsylvania Core Standards in reading and writing for Science and Technical Subjects and the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Health, Safety, and Physical Education are applied within the course via research projects based on focused questions, summarizing the key supporting details and ideas, using technology and participating in a range of conversations, collaborations, and debates with diverse partners.

The wellness portion of the course focuses on Health Literacy, Decision-Making, Goal-Setting, Interpersonal Communication, Stress, Body Systems, and Nutrition. Within these units, students analyze how health concepts are essential for wellness and a health-enhancing lifestyle, distinguish community well-being as dependent upon a balance of personal and social responsibility, and investigate how safety impacts individual and community well-being. This course focuses on concepts to improve the students’ current knowledge and level of emotional/mental health, physical health, and social health. The essential question surrounding this course portion is ‘What are the outcomes of various safe and unsafe practices and what impact can the outcomes have on my life and the lives of others around me?’

During the fitness portion of this course, students are introduced to a variety of exercise options that promote health and well-being. Using technology, such as heart rate monitors and pedometers, along with state of the art fitness equipment, students are introduced to the components of fitness- cardio-respiratory endurance, strength and conditioning, flexibility and body composition. This course is designed for students to become familiar with
the fitness center and to introduce basic concepts and principles associated with physical fitness to successfully prepare them for the full year Wellness/Fitness 12 course. The essential question for this course portion is ‘What criteria will you use to determine if your health behaviors are responsible now and in the future?’

Wellness/Fitness 12

The 12th-grade Wellness/Fitness course is designed to acquaint students with the benefits of physical activity so they may pursue a healthy lifestyle. Students rotate in and out of the fitness center and the classroom exploring fitness components, such as cardiovascular endurance, muscular strength and endurance, flexibility, body composition, and nutrition. Knowledge learned in the classroom is applied in the fitness center to increase their personal fitness levels. The Pennsylvania Core Standards in reading and writing for Science and Technical Subjects and the Pennsylvania Academic Standards for Health, Safety, and Physical Education are addressed within the course via research projects based on focused questions, summarizing the key supporting details and ideas, using technology and reference materials to determine meaning of multiple meaning words and phrases and preparing for, and participating in a range of conversations, collaborations, and debates with diverse partners. During the third and fourth marking periods, students work towards their certification in CPR, First Aid, and AED through the American Heart Association.

The wellness portion of the course focuses on Health Literacy, Addictions (Legal & Illegal Drugs/Tobacco/Alcohol, Texting, and Internet), Human Sexuality/Diseases/Reproduction and CPR/First Aid/ AED. Within these units, students analyze how health concepts are essential for wellness and a health-enhancing lifestyle, distinguish community well-being as dependent upon a balance of personal and social responsibility, and investigate how safety impacts individual and community well-being. The essential question surrounding this course portion is “What are the outcomes of various safe and unsafe practices and what impact can the outcomes have on my life and the lives of others around me?”

During the fitness portion of this course, students are exposed to a variety of lifetime activities that promote health and well-being. Using technology, such as heart rate monitors and pedometers, along with state of the art fitness equipment, students create their own Individualized Fitness Program based upon the components of fitness- cardio-respiratory endurance, strength and conditioning, weight training, flexibility, body composition. The essential question for this course portion is “What criteria will you use to determine if your health behaviors are responsible now and in the future?”

This course is required for graduation.

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Schnecksville, PA
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Our mission at LCTI is to prepare all students for successful careers and lifelong learning.